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Installing and configuring cisco ios software modularity

installing and configuring cisco ios software modularity

The Cisco software feature documentation in this configuration guide often includes information about features that are shared across software releases and. To install Cisco IOS Software Modularity base system files and patches, use the install file command in privileged EXEC mode. install file source-file-url. the “Installing and Configuring Cisco IOS Software Modularity” module. Table 1 shows features or Cisco IOS command-line interface (CLI) commands that are. LIL BOOSIE ZOOM DIRTY MP3 DOWNLOAD Вы можете прийти к нам.

Additionally, use Cisco Feature Navigator to find information about feature, platform, and software image support. Any Internet Protocol IP addresses and phone numbers used in this document are not intended to be actual addresses and phone numbers. Any examples, command display output, network topology diagrams, and other figures included in the document are shown for illustrative purposes only. Any use of actual IP addresses or phone numbers in illustrative content is unintentional and coincidental.

Skip to content Skip to search Skip to footer. Search Find Matches in This Book. Log in to Save Content. PDF - Complete Book To return to the default core filename, use the no form of this command. Optional In Software Modularity images, if this argument is not specified, the default core file is named using the name of the process that is being dumped. Specifies an upper limit of a range so that core dumps of more than one process can be created without overwriting the previous core dump.

Number, in the range from 1 to 64, that represents the upper limit. Turns on dump file compression. By default, compression is turned off. Adds a time stamp to the core dump file. This command was introduced. The limit , compress , and timestamp keywords were added to support Software Modularity images.

If the router's memory is larger than 16 MB, the whole core file will not be copied to the server. Therefore, use rcp or FTP to dump the core file. The network dump is not supported in Software Modularity images. In the following example, the router is configured to use FTP to dump a core file named dumpfile to the FTP server at In the following example, the router is configured to dump the main memory used by the TCP process to a file named dump-tcp when the TCP process crashes.

The dump file is configured with an upper limit of 20, to be compressed, and to have a time stamp applied. Note The exception protocol and exception dump commands are not supported in Software Modularity images. Causes the router to dump a core file to a particular server when the router crashes. Causes the router to create a core dump and reboot when certain memory size parameters are violated.

Causes the router to create a core dump and reload after a specified number of spurious interrupts. To change the size of the buffer used for crash info files, use the exception crashinfo buffersize command in global configuration mode. To revert to the default buffer size, use the no form of this command.

This command was introduced for the Cisco series only , , and platforms. This command was implemented in NSP images. This command was integrated into Release The crash info file saves information that helps Cisco technical support representatives to debug problems that caused the Cisco IOS image to fail crash. The device writes the crash information to the console at the time of the failure, and the file is created the next time you boot the Cisco IOS image after the failure instead of while the system is failing.

Note If you are running a Software Modularity image, setting the crash info buffer size to the default of 32 KB does not limit the crash info buffer size. The crash info file size is limited to the value set if the value is set to anything other than the default 32 KB.

Enables the creation of a diagnostic file at the time of unexpected system shutdowns. To set the local dump location for core files when a process reloads, use the exception flash command in global configuration mode. You can configure up to three destinations, and the order in which the dump locations are used follows the order in which the destinations are configured.

To configure a networking device to dump the kernel memory, use the exception kernel command in global configuration mode. To turn off the kernel dump facility, use the no form of this command. Optional Name of the kernel dump file. Because this file is a compressed file, a. Z suffix is added to the name. Location to which the core dump file is written. The supported locations are bootflash: or disk n :. For disk n : or bootflash: , the path value is the absolute path to the file. Optional Specifies that only kernel memory is to be dumped.

If not specified, both user memory and kernel memory are dumped. Use the exception kernel command to dump kernel memory when the kernel reloads. This is different from process dump, in which a process on the networking device reloads, but not the networking device itself. In order to successfully capture a kernel dump, the filesystem configured must be physically attached to the processor that is crashing.

So, a kernel core dump for the SP must be written to a filesystem attached to the SP e. Although it is possible to configure up to 3 separate paths for the kernel core dump, only the first one will ever be used. After attempting to write to the first filesystem, subsequent filesystems will be ignored, and the system will reboot. The implications of this are that you must be careful to configure the kernel core dump correctly such that it will be captured on the first attempt, for either the SP or the RP depending on which is required.

For distributed networking devices, the line card number is added to the default name assigned to the kernel core dump file. Optional Name of the kernel core file. Use the exception switch kernel command to dump kernel memory when the kernel reloads on the SP. This operation is different from process dump in which a process on the networking device reloads, but not the networking device itself.

This command is used to configure where and what to dump. If the dump is to bootflash: , the exception switch kernel command is all that is required. The filepath keyword only accepts file systems available to the SP. To activate the current pending change set, use the install activate command in privileged EXEC mode. Local directory specified in the destination-directory argument of a previously executed install file command.

Use the install activate command after a patch file or maintenance pack MP has been installed. The state of files in the pending change set will change depending on whether a reload is required. Cisco IOS Software Modularity introduces the concept of installed software that is different from just booting an image on the networking device. To gain the benefits of the Cisco IOS Software Modularity Installer and permit patch files to be installed, use the install file command to write the software to flash.

Installation and activation are now separate processes. The install bind command is used to bind Cisco IOS Software Modularity base images system-wide; and the install activate command must be entered to activate a patch. Some patches will require a reload to be performed, and a message appears on the console after the install activate command has been entered to note the current state of the patch.

Table 5 shows whether the patch code is running in the various patch states. For more details about activating a patch, including a flowchart of the various patch states, see the "Cisco IOS Software Modularity Installation and Configuration" module.

The following example shows how to activate the current pending change set for the sys directory:. To bind a Cisco IOS Software Modularity software image system-wide, use the install bind command in global configuration mode. To remove the Software Modularity software binding, use the no form of this command.

Directory to be bound as specified in the destination-directory argument of a previously executed install file command. The install bind command generates a boot system command, but the install bind command is not inserted into the configuration. The benefit in using the install bind command is that you just specify the search root directory, which is the destination directory used in the install file command, and the Cisco IOS Software Modularity software will determine the directory structure and image file.

If you use the boot system command, you must enter the complete directory path and image name. Each instance of the boot system command generated by an install bind command is saved in the configuration file in the order in which it was configured, which is the normal behavior for boot system commands.

To configure a system to have the newly installed Software Modularity image as the primary image to boot, you must remove all previous boot system commands in the configuration and enter them in the order in which you want them to run. Alternatively, you can download the startup configuration to a text file, insert the new install bind or boot system command, and copy the changes back into the startup configuration.

To remove all boot system commands from the configuration file, use the no form of the boot system command without any arguments. Using the no form of the install bind command will remove only the boot system commands for installed software and leave other boot system commands intact. Note Use the install bind command to bind one or more Software Modularity images, and then copy the changes to the startup configuration file.

Be aware that an image reload or switchover must be performed before the installed and bound image is actually running on the device. The following example shows how to remove all existing boot system commands and to bind the Software Modularity image in the directory named sys:. To remove an entire installed software system, use the install clear command in privileged EXEC mode.

Use the install clear command with caution because the command cannot be reversed. After an installation is cleared, it cannot be undone. Software that is currently running or that has been bound to run cannot be cleared.

For bound software, you must remove the binding with the no install bind command before using the install clear command. The following example shows how to clear the system installed in the local directory named sys:. To define a tag name for a set of Cisco IOS Software Modularity software installed in the destination directory of a previously executed install file command, use the install commit command in privileged EXEC mode.

String of characters to identify a set of software installed in the search-root-directory value. This command creates a point to which a user can roll back a system after a patch is installed that is considered unsatisfactory.

The tag-name argument provides a name for the point. A tag name must be unique to the local file system. Use the install prune command to remove a previously defined tag from the installed software. The following example shows how to define a tag named tag1 to identify the software installed in the local directory named sys:.

Removes a tag from the software installed in a directory specified in a previously executed install file command. Local directory specified in a previously executed install file command. Use the install copy command to duplicate the Cisco IOS Software Modularity software at the source directory and place it at the destination directory. Both the source and destination directories must be local to the device. The following example shows how to copy the software in the directory named sys into a directory named oldsys:.

Path of an installable file that contains the code to be installed. The installable file may be on a local file system or on a remote file system. Path of the destination directory in which the installable file is to be installed. Optional Enables prompting of the user before certain actions and activates more detailed output during the installation process. Use the optional interactive keyword to display more detailed output during the installation. Messages indicating current tasks that are being performed during the installation may be displayed.

The default output is a series of! To gain the benefits of the Cisco IOS Software Modularity Installer and permit patch files to be installed, use the install file command to write the software to local storage. Installation and activation are now separate processes; and the install activate command must be entered to activate patches.

Use the show install command to display information about the currently installed software. Use the install clear command to remove an entire installed software system, or use the install rollback command to remove specific patches installed on top of the software version. The following example shows how to install two different files from two different paths into the same local directory:.

Use the install move command to copy the Cisco IOS Software Modularity software from a source directory to a destination directory and then remove the software from the source directory. Both the source and destination directories must be local. To remove a tag or unused files from the software that is installed in the destination directory specified in a previously executed install file command, use the install prune command in privileged EXEC mode. Directory specified in the destination-directory argument of a previously executed install file command.

String of characters to identify a set of software as previously defined by the install commit command. Optional Cleans and removes all unused and nonactive files from the base image to the tag specified by the tag-name argument. The tag specified by the tag-name attribute is not removed.

In addition to removing the tag from the installed software, the install prune command removes any files that are no longer required by the system as a result of the tag removal. After this command is executed, rollback can be performed to any previously installed tag. When this command is executed using the optional files keyword, all of the tags from the base image to the tag specified are removed except for the specified tag.

After this command is entered with the optional files keyword, rollback cannot be done to any tag beyond the specified tag; rollback can be performed to the base image only. The following example shows how to remove the tag named tag1 from the installed software. The following example shows how to remove all of the tags from the base image up to tag1.

Tag1 is not removed. Defines a tag for a set of software installed by the install file command. To create an installation or backup installable file from an installed system when a Cisco IOS Software Modularity image is running, use the install repackage command in privileged EXEC mode. Local or remote URL that specifies the path and name of the destination file to which the installable file is written.

To allow for easier deployment of a base image and several patches to multiple routers, an installable bundled image, referred to as a repackage, can be replicated. Use the install repackage command to generate a installable file from an installed system. The installable file can be used in an installation on another device or as a backup installation for the current device.

While the image is being replicated, the Software Modularity Installer saves everything in the installed state including rollback tags. An initial boot must be performed on the device on which the replicated image is to be installed. The ability to create a repackage allows standard installations to be performed across the network and saves installation time.

The following example shows how to create an installation or backup file named sfinance-vm. Similar to the idea of a database rollback, Cisco IOS Software Modularity images can roll back to a set of installed files defined by a tag. The installed system is captured at a point in time by defining a tag using the install commit command.

If a subsequent installation of a patch file adversely affects the installed system, a rollback can be performed using the defined tag. The install activate command must be entered after the install rollback command to activate the rollback. All installation actions performed since the tag was defined are deleted, and the processes affected by the rollback of installed software are restarted after the rollback is activated.

After the restart, these processes use the software that was present at the time the tag was created. Tags can be deleted, and the system will remove all installation files that will now never be used because the tag has been removed. The following example shows how to roll back the software to the time that tag1 was defined and then restart all the affected processes. The tag named tag1 is assumed to have been created using the install commit command in an earlier configuration.

Note Only processes that are controlled by the System Manager can be restarted. Optional Process number. The first process is numbered 1, and this is the default if no number is specified. The colon is required. This command was enhanced to display console and error messages about possible configuration losses at restart.

The process restart command can be used to restart a newly installed version of an executable. Under special circumstances, it can also be used to restart a process that is operating in suboptimal mode. Only processes that are controlled by the System Manager can be restarted.

When restarting, a process will retrieve the previous state information from the saved configuration checkpoint. A cold restart means that the process will delete the previous state information from the saved configuration checkpoint. If the process restart command is entered without first saving the active running configuration session and checkpointing the configuration changes, the changes could be lost. The following console warning about this possible configuration loss is displayed:.

To checkpoint the configuration, save the currently running configuration by entering the write memory or the copy running-config startup-config command. In Software Modularity, you cannot restart a process on the standby router. The standby router console is disabled by default. If you enable the standby router console, and then enter the process restart command to restart a process, the standby console will reload and display one of the following error messages:.

Optional One or more command-line arguments that are passed to the initiating process. The process start command is used to control POSIX processes and processes that are registered with sysmgr by using. Output for processes that are running in the foreground is directed to the tty including Telnet that initiates the command. Output for processes that are running in the background is directed only to the console.

Note Only processes that are not controlled by the System Manager can be stopped. Use the process stop command to shut down terminate the specified process and any simultaneously executing copies. The process is not restarted, even if it had a respawn option specified. Note System-manager-controlled processes for example, cdp2.

To enable implicit configuration checkpointing when a Cisco IOS Software Modularity image is running, use the service checkpoint-config command in global configuration mode. To disable the configuration checkpoint process, use the no form of this command.

Implicit configuration checkpointing means that configuration checkpointing occurs for all processes. A Software Modularity process can be restarted under an error condition or after upgrading. When the process is restarted and operational, the state of the process returns to the state the process was in prior to the restart. The software checkpoints the configuration information and when the process restarts, the configuration information is read from the checkpoint.

The write checkpoint command is visible only after you enter the no service checkpoint-config command. If you have a large configuration file, the default configuration checkpoint process may take some time to complete and prevent you from entering other CLI commands to save or display the configuration. To disable the checkpoint process, enter the no form of the service checkpoint-config command.

When you are ready to run the configuration checkpoint process, use the write checkpoint command to run the configuration checkpoint process. In the following example, the no form of the service checkpoint-config command is entered to disable the configuration checkpoint process, configuration commands are entered, and after exiting from the configuration mode the write checkpoint command is entered to run the configuration checkpoint process.

Displays buffers connected to Packet Manager. POSIX process identifier. Optional Displays interface pool information. If an interface type is specified and this interface has its own buffer pool, information for that pool is displayed. The option to filter display output based on specific buffer pools was expanded.

To view the appropriate output, choose one of the following sections:. The following is sample output from the show buffers command with no arguments, showing all buffer pool information:. The following is sample output from the show buffers command with no arguments, showing only buffer pool information for Huge buffers.

This output shows a highest total of five Huge buffers created five days and 18 hours before the command was issued. This output shows a highest total of Huge buffers created one hour, one minute, and 15 seconds before the command was issued. The following is sample output from the show buffers command with an interface type and interface number:. Table 6 describes the significant fields shown in the display. Small structures used as placeholders for buffers in internal operating system queues.

Used when a buffer may need to be on more than one queue. Count of buffer allocation attempts that resulted in growing the buffer pool to allocate a buffer. Count of new buffers created to satisfy buffer allocation attempts when the available buffers in the pool have already been allocated. Total number of this type of buffer. Number of these buffers that are permanent. Maximum number of buffers created highest total and the time when that peak occurred.

Formats include weeks, days, hours, minutes, and seconds. Not all systems report a peak value, which means this field may not display in output. Count of buffer allocation attempts that resulted in growing the buffer pool in order to allocate a buffer. Count of buffers released to the system because they were not being used. This field is displayed only for dynamic buffer pools, not interface buffer pools, which are static.

Count of new buffers created in response to misses. Count of buffer allocation attempts that resulted in falling back to the public buffer pool that is the smallest pool at least as big as the interface buffer pool. Maximum number of buffers from the pool of that interface that can be in the buffer pool cache of that interface. Each interface buffer pool has its own cache.

These are not additional to the permanent buffers; they come from the buffer pools of the interface. Some interfaces place all of their buffers from the interface pool into the cache. In this case, it is normal for the free list to display 0.

Total number of times a buffer creation failed. The failure may have occurred because of a number of different reasons, such as low processor memory, low IOMEM, or no buffers in the pool when called from interrupt context. Number of times there has been low memory during buffer creation. Low or no memory during buffer creation may not necessarily mean that buffer creation failed; memory can be obtained from an alternate resource such as a fallback pool.

Two new output fields were introduced—Public buffer heads and Temporary buffer heads—and are shown within comments in the following sample output. Table 7 describes the significant fields shown in the display that are different from the fields in Table 6. Total number of allocation requests that have failed because no buffer was available for allocation; the datagram was lost.

Such failures normally occur at interrupt level. Use the show exception command to display the current process and kernel dumper configuration as configured by the various exception commands used in Software Modularity images.

The following is sample output from the show exception command:. Table 8 describes the significant fields shown in the display. Displays information about the software that is currently running on each location in the system. A local directory specified as the destination directory in a previously executed install file command. The following is sample output from the show install running command:.

Table 9 describes the significant fields shown in the display. Indicates whether the file is a base image file B , a patch file P , or a maintenance pack MP file. An asterisk under this column indicates that this file has been committed under a user-defined tag.

Current state of the software file. Name and path of an installed file on the system. If the filename ends with some text in parenthesis, the text represents the Cisco IOS version number of the image file. The following is sample output from the show install running command with the detailed keyword:.

Table 10 describes the significant fields shown in the display. In the following example, the show install privileged EXEC command is used to display information about the tags that are defined for this system:. Table 11 describes the significant fields shown in the display. In the following example, the show install privileged EXEC command is used to display detailed information about the tags that are defined for this system:.

Table 12 describes the significant fields shown in the display. Optional Memory type to display processor , multibus , io , or sram. If memory-type is not specified, statistics for all memory types present are displayed. Optional Displays details about memory block header corruption corrections when the exception memory ignore overflow global configuration command is configured. Optional Displays a summary of memory usage including the size and number of blocks allocated for each address of the system call that allocated the block.

This command was enhanced with the overflow keyword to display details about memory block header corruption corrections. The command output was updated to display information about transient memory pools. The show memory command displays information about memory available after the system image decompresses and loads. No optional keywords or arguments are supported for the show memory command when a Software Modularity image is running.

The following is sample output from the show memory command:. The following is sample output from the show memory free command:. The output of the show memory free command contains the same types of information as the show memory output, except that only free memory is displayed, and the information is ordered by free list. The first section of the display includes summary statistics about the activities of the system memory allocator.

Table 13 describes the significant fields shown in the first section of the display. The second section of the display is a block-by-block listing of memory use. Table 14 describes the significant fields shown in the second section of the display. Reference count for that memory block, indicating how many different processes are using that block of memory.

Name of process that owns the block, or " fragment " if the block is a fragment, or " coalesced " if the block was coalesced from adjacent free blocks. The following is sample output from the show memory io command:. The following example displays details of a memory block overflow correction when the exception memory ignore overflow global configuration command is configured:. The report includes the amount of time since the last correction was made and the name of the file that logged the memory block overflow details.

The show memory sram command displays the free SRAM memory blocks. For the Cisco router, this command supports the high-speed static RAM memory pool to make it easier for you to debug or diagnose problems with allocation or freeing of such memory. The following is sample output from the show memory sram command:. The show memory summary command displays a summary of all memory pools and memory usage per Alloc PC address of the system call that allocated the block. The following is a partial sample output from the show memory summary command.

This output shows the size, blocks, and bytes allocated. Bytes equal the size multiplied by the blocks. For a description of the other fields, see Table 13 and Table Table 15 describes the significant fields shown in the display. Configures the Cisco IOS software to correct corruptions in memory block headers and allow a router to continue its normal operation. Optional Displays detailed memory usage by address of the system call that allocated the block.

Optional Displays summary information about memory usage per system call that allocated the block. Detailed output of the process memory on the device is displayed with this command. The POSIX memory information includes the address, the size in bytes, and the type of memory used by various segments such as program-text, data, stack, shared memory, device memory, and heap.

The following is partial sample output from the show memory detailed command for a Cisco IOS process:. The first section of the display shows system summary information. Table 16 describes the significant fields shown in the first section of the display. The second section of the display includes process summary statistics about the activities of the system memory allocator. Table 17 describes the significant fields shown in the second section of the display.

Amount of memory, in kilobytes, used by the text segment of the specified process. Amount of memory, in kilobytes, used by the data segment of the specified process. Amount of memory, in kilobytes, used by the stack segment of the specified process. Amount of memory, in kilobytes, used by the dynamic segment of the specified process.

Size of the process heap. Note that the Cisco IOS memory management library allocates heap dynamically. Table 18 describes the significant fields shown in the third section of the display. Type of memory segment that owns the block, or " fragment " if the block is a fragment, or " coalesced " if the block was coalesced from adjacent free blocks. The fourth section of the display shows Cisco IOS memory information as a block-by-block listing of memory use. Table 19 describes the significant fields shown in the fourth section of the display.

Displays the process history in an ordered format. An integer that specifies the process for which memory and CPU utilization data shall be returned. Although no optional keywords or arguments are supported for the base show processes command when a Software Modularity image is running, more details about processes are displayed using the show processes cpu , show processes detailed , show processes kernel , and show processes memory commands.

The following is sample output from the s how processes command:. Table 20 describes the fields shown in the display. CPU utilization for the last 5 seconds. The second number indicates the percentage of CPU time spent at the interrupt level. Process queue priority. Possible values: C critical , H high , M medium , and L low. Scheduler test.

Note Because platforms have a 4- to 8-millisecond clock resolution, run times are considered reliable only after a large number of invocations or a reasonable, measured run time. The following is sample output from the s how processes history command:. Table 21 describes the significant fields shown in the display.

Execution time of the most recent run or the total execution time of the most recent consecutive runs. The following is sample output from the s how processes process-id command:. Table 22 describes the fields shown in the display. This section contains fields that show the memory used by the specified process. This section contains fields that show the CPU resources used by the specified process. Current state of the process. The following is sample output from the show processes command when a Cisco IOS Software Modularity image is running:.

Table 23 describes the significant fields shown in the display. Table 23 show processes Software Modularity Field Descriptions. Displays information about System Manager kernel processes when a Software Modularity image is running. Optional For cisco IOS images only. Displays CPU utilization sorted by percentage. If you use the optional history keyword, three graphs are displayed for Cisco IOS images:. Maximum usage is measured and recorded every second; average usage is calculated on periods of more than one second.

Consistently high CPU utilization over an extended period of time indicates a problem and using the show processes cpu command is useful for troubleshooting. Also, you can use the output of this command in the Cisco Output Interpreter tool to display potential issues and fixes.

Output Interpreter is available to registered users of Cisco. The horizontal axis shows times for example, 0, 5, 10, 15 minutes , and the vertical axis shows total percentage of CPU utilization 0 to percent. The following is sample output from the show processes cpu command without keywords:. The following is sample output of the one-hour portion of the output.

The Y-axis of the graph is the CPU utilization. The X-axis of the graph is the increment within the time period displayed in the graph. This example shows the individual minutes during the previous hour. The most recent measurement is on the left of the X-axis. The top two rows, read vertically, display the highest percentage of CPU utilization recorded during the time increment.

In this example, the CPU utilization for the last minute recorded is 66 percent. The device may have reached 66 percent only once during that minute, or it may have reached 66 percent multiple times. The device records only the peak reached during the time increment and the average over the course of that increment. The following is sample output from the show processes cpu command that shows an ARP probe process:. Table 24 describes the fields shown in the output. The second number indicates the percent of CPU time spent at the interrupt level.

Note Because platforms have a 4- to 8-millisecond clock resolution, run times are considered reliable only after several invocations or a reasonable, measured run time. The following is sample output from the show processes cpu command when a Software Modularity image is running:.

Table 25 describes the significant fields shown in the display. Table 25 show processes cpu Software Modularity Field Descriptions. Total CPU utilization for the last 5 seconds. Percentage of CPU time spent at the interrupt level for this process during the last five seconds. Percentage of CPU time spent at the interrupt level for this process during the last minute.

Percentage of CPU time spent at the interrupt level for this process during the last five minutes. The following is partial sample output from the show processes cpu command with the detailed keyword when a Software Modularity image is running:. Table 26 describes the significant fields shown in the display. Table 26 show processes cpu detailed Software Modularity Field Descriptions.

If no process ID or process name is specified, detailed information is displayed about all processes. Use the show processes detailed command to gather detailed information about the number of tasks running, the process state, and other information about a process that is not displayed by the show processes command.

The following is sample output from the show processes detailed command for the process named sysmgr. Table 27 describes the significant fields shown in the display. The following is sample output from the show processes kernel command with the family keyword:. Table 28 describes the significant fields shown in the display. Process ID of the parent process. This process is the child of the identified process. The following is sample output from the show processes kernel command with the files keyword:.

Table 29 describes the significant fields shown in the display. The following is sample output from the show processes kernel command with the signal keyword:. Table 30 describes the significant fields shown in the display. Signals in a pending state waiting to be unblocked from a POSIX process or process thread shown in hexadecimal format.

A signal is an asynchronous notification of an event. Signals can be directed to a process or to a process thread. Signals waiting for the scheduler to run the signal handler, shown in hexadecimal format. The following is sample output from the show processes kernel command with the startup keyword:. Table 31 describes the significant fields shown in the display.

When you specify a process ID, only details for the specified process will be shown. Optional Displays memory data sorted by the "Allocated, " "Getbufs," or "Holding" column. If the sorted keyword is used by itself, data is sorted by the "Holding" column by default. Optional Displays memory data sorted by the "Getbufs" Get Buffers column. Optional Displays memory data sorted by the "Holding" column. This is the default. The system memory followed by a one-line summary of memory information about each Software Modularity process is displayed.

The sorted [ allocated getbufs holding ] syntax was introduced. The output of the header line was updated to support the Memory Thresholding feature. This enhancement also corrected a total process memory mismatch error mismatch between show processes memory , show processes memory sorted , and show memory and its variants. The show processes memory command and show processes memory sorted command displays a summary of total, used, and free memory, followed by a list of processes and their memory impact.

If the standard show processes memory process-id command is used, processes are sorted by their process ID PID. If the show processes memory sorted command is used, the default sorting is by the Holding value. The first line header line of the show processes memory [ sorted ] command listed Total memory, Used memory, and Free memory values. Output in Releases In Releases This feature affected the header line and the "Holding" column of the show processes memory command as follows.

However, the show processes memory sorted version of this command, and other commands, such as the show memory summary command, did not include the alternate memory pool in the totals in other words, these commands showed the total value for the Processor memory pool only. This caused an observed mismatch of memory totals between commands.

Beginning in Releases An "alternate memory pool" is a memory pool which can be used as an alternative to allocate memory when the target main memory pool has been filled. For example, many platforms have a memory type called "Fast" that is limited to a small size because the memory media used for Fast memory is expensive.

To prevent memory allocations from failing once the available Fast memory has been used up, the normal Processor memory can be configured as an alternative memory pool for the Fast memory pool. Use the show processes memory command without any arguments and keywords to display the system memory followed by a one-line summary of memory information about each modular Cisco IOS process. Use the detailed keyword with this command to display detailed memory information about all processes.

Example output varies between Cisco IOS software releases. The following is sample output from the show processes memory command:. Table 32 describes the significant fields shown in the display. Bytes of memory freed by the process, regardless of who originally allocated it. Total amount of memory, in kilobytes, held by all processes sum of the "Holding" column.

The following is sample output from the show processes memory command when the sorted keyword is used. In this case, the output is sorted by the "Holding" column, from largest to smallest. The following is sample output from the show processes memory command when a Process ID process-id is specified:.

The following example shows the output of the show processes memory command before the changes to the summary information were made. The following is sample output from the show processes memory command when a Cisco IOS Software Modularity image is running:.

Table 33 describes the significant fields shown in the display. Table 33 show processes memory Software Modularity Field Descriptions. The following is sample output from the show processes memory command with details about the memory of the process named cdp2. The following is sample output from the show processes memory command with details about the memory of process and the task with the ID of Table 34 describes the significant fields shown in the display that are different from Table Table 34 show processes memory detailed process-id taskid Field Descriptions.

The following is sample output from the show processes memory command with details about the memory of POSIX process ID with summary process memory usage per allocator:. Table 35 describes the significant fields shown in the display. Table 35 show processes memory detailed alloc-summary Field Descriptions. The transport protocol statistics are generally counters, though some are averages and time stamps. Use the show raw statistics command to display the raw IP statistics, and use the clear raw statistics command to reset the raw IP statistics.

To view the other transport protocol statistics used in Software Modularity, see the show tcp statistics and show udp statistics commands. The following is sample output from the show raw statistics command:. Table 36 describes the significant fields shown in the display. A packet level of 0 Clear shows that less than 67 percent of the packet supply is in use. A packet level of 1 Warn shows that at least 67 percent of the packet supply is in use, and a packet level of 2 Alarm shows that at least 90 percent of the packet supply is in use.

Number of packets dropped by raw IP because of no registered protocol. Each dropped packet generates an ICMP protocol unreachable message. Number of packets enqueued on socket send buffers, receive buffers, or reassembly queues. In summary, the number of packets currently being held by the transport protocol. Number of packets released by the transport protocol due to memory warnings or memory alarms.

Number of times that the transport protocol notified applications about input data. Number of packets with a time delay of more than one millisecond between the time of notification and the time the packet was read. If no options are specified, registry information is displayed for all registries. The following is sample output from the show registry command using the brief keyword:.

Table 37 describes the significant fields shown in the display. The following is partial sample output from the show registry command when running a software Modularity image:.

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